Eurotour of 2014 Part 4

With the kick off time at Cracovia being 18.00, and the overnight train leaving for Prague just before ten, it was an easy walk back to the station for the train. For my third overnight of the tour, I could not get a sleeping compartment and had to settle for a couchette. I was somewhat fortunate in only having one room mate, a retired Canadian. With no socket to plug in my anti-snoring machine, I was also lucky that my companion did not found my night noise very disturbing. I wanted to get another double header onto the trip, and I needed to return to Prague due to a minor disaster on the Monday. When I was dragging my case to the station it fell and the handle broke. I thought the best solution was to go for an instant replacement from the shop at the station. I then had the mad repacking on the shop floor to re-arrange my goods and allow the shop to dispose of the broken case. I thought I had taken everything with me, but then realised there was another pocket I had not emptied. This contained my oyster card, headphones to allow me to listen to music from the computer and most crucially my Sat.Nav system. I realised the mistake within an hour of leaving the city, and with the help of the train conductors, managed to phone back to the shop who found my stuff and promised it to keep it safe and sound until I returned. I am pleased to say this was a success and hence the temporary loss of stuff was only a temporary inconvenience.

Having collected my possessions, and placed them safely in a left luggage locker, I took the metro to Strizkov, six stops from the main station. From here it is a short walk to the ground of Bohemians Praha. When the original Bohemians Praha folded, the people running Strizkov saw the opportunity pick up some of their supporter base and quickly registered the change of name for their own club. I suspect they intended to try and gain the lease of Dolicek, and re-create an image of the original club. This hardly new in the Czech republic or even in Prague. The current Dukla team is another club that took over the original name some time after club had merged with, and decamped to Pribram. However the fans at Bohemians had a different idea, taking inspiration from the goings on n England and especially at AFC Wimbledon, they decided not to follow some other club owner but to own their own club. With Bohemians Praha name taken, this club is now Bohemians 1905. Crucially, the supporters’ club got to use Dolicek. I am not certain their venture would have been a success otherwise. After this, relations between the two Bohemians clubs were not helped by a dispute over the use of the kangaroo on the club badges. Both in fact now use almost identical badges including the kangaroo.

The ground is Strizkov is listed by the Czech FA as SK Prosek, which I think is the name of the hospital near to adjacent. It is a straightforward affair, with a single stand filling almost the entire length of one side and containing some 700 seats in a mixed variety of colours which looks quite pleasing from the distance. All the buildings are behind one goal, while there is room to stand opposite the main stand between the grass pitch and the adjacent poorly maintained 3G surface. It least if it does belong to the hospital, anyone who injures themselves on the creased surface where the carpet has been allowed to ride up in ridges will not have far to go for treatment. Despite the return of poor weather after my week in the hot sunshine of Poland, Bohemians had decided that the small number of visitors from Sokolov should be segregated on the far side. Until it started raining, I am sure they were happy there, but maybe some accommodation should have been made. I estimate the total attendance at the game around 140, with the away fans numbered in single figures, so I do not think this was really a high security situation. The Sokolov fans had a drummer and made a lot of noise from the start for such a small group. The home fans had no less than four trumpeters, although they were more sparing in their contribution to the musical battle. We had to wait around 15 minutes before they started their concert with a rendition of “Yellow Submarine”. Bohemians know they must finish in a relegation position, while Sokolov start her day in fourth, but too many points behind to catch any of those above them. A classic was not in prospect, and a classic was not delivered. Sokolov were always the better team, but somehow it was Bohemians took the lead ten minutes into the second half. The equaliser came some twenty minutes later, but neither team had enough to chase after a winner.

Now picture a single track railway line winding its way across rolling green hillsides. It could almost be England, except of course for the existence of a single track railway line winding its way across the rolling green hillsides. With the train for the forty minute journey from Besenov to Vlasim being a single unit railcar, I was slightly worried that the unit could be filled with away football fans. In fact none came by train, and my only worry was noticing that the speaker on the train kept on announcing stations, and then the train running straight through without stopping. Vlasim is the crossover point where trains in each direction can pass, and all trains have to stop there. My first impression was of a very small quiet town, (but democratic, there was a queue to vote in the Euro elections). Then you reach the castle. This is actually a stately home, mainly converted as a museum, and with extremely extensive landscaped garden leading down to the river and containing a number of buildings including a faux Chinese pavilion, clearly designed by someone who had seen pictures, but never the real thing.

My game was important, the visiting club, Dynamo Ceske Budejovice started the day third in the league (three games) to play, just one point behind Hradrec Kralove, and two behind Taborsko, so I was envisaging a considerable crowd for a ground where the quoted capacity of 6000 owes a lot to the imagination. SO I made sure I was at the ground in good time, and knew my way back to the station – there may be as little as 10 minutes to get back for my train, (which would mean more than five waiting at the station).

Going for the ever popular, “header wide of target” option

In reality, it was all quiet as I paid my 60 Kcs to enter and another 10 Kcs for a programme. I was hot from the walk and immediately bought a bottle of water and sat on the benches outside to admire the views. I decided against having a Klobasa (the Czech red fatty sausage),while noting that this was also the name of a home sub. With everything quiet and no massive invasion of away fans, it was easy to pick up my team sheet, and even have a beer before kick off as well. The ground consists of a small stand, (not more than 400 seats) with bench seating over grass each side of this. On the far side are a few rows of open seats, while the ends are flat. You can walk all the way around, except a small area near the entrance (which while fenced off, does include more bench seating). The pitch was in perfect condition, and despite average attendances under 500 (this game had 360), they have installed one of the pop-up sprinkler systems seen in the Football League. In the end, there were only a handful of visiting fans, and these did not even group together during the game

Ceske Budejovice (in Germany, they say Budweis) were the better side throughout the game, but they found it very difficult to get a goal. The only goal coming midway through the second half, when a free kick from Bruncik from the right evaded everyone and run straight into the goal. Although there was a lot of time wasting at the end, it felt unnecessary, the home side rarely looked capable of scoring. Still time wasting works well when the result is an occasional booking, which itself wastes time not added on. In the end, we had one minute of injury time (as we actually had the trainer on the field), but nothing extra for time wasting or substitutions. When the other results came through, neither Hradrec Kralove or Taborsko won on the weekend. This meant that Ceske Budejovice went to the top, thanks to their superior goal difference.

The Nepstadion still sets there in Budapest, close to the Keleti Stadium. They do not build them like this anymore. At its peak, it held 104,000 – its capacity today is quoted at 56,000. For the Hungarian Cup Final, 22,000 turn up

I will not use the name Ferenc Puskas Stadium. To be called Ferenc Pukas you need to be the best, and this stadium, a relic of the soviet age does not deserve that name. It is a large bowl with a tier of seating all around. A second larger tier sits above the first on the side opposite the main stand. The main stand itself is the only thing that has been refurbished, and the only area with cover. It is given over entirely to VIP and Media.

I had a 1000 Forint (about £3) ticket using the Hungarian FA’s less than easy booking system. This was required as the signs clearly said no tickets on the day. I chanced my luck with the media accreditation and was told no, and then they changed their mind and said yes, so I got my upgrade, the teamlists and a free cup of coffee!

The ground currently holds 56,000. Around 22,000 turned up. That means the upper tier was uninhabited, the fans from the two clubs filled (but nowhere near 100%) the two ends, and a curiously quiet four blocks immediately opposite the main stand had small groups of people in them. These tickets were not on sale on the net (if they were, I would have had one), so I am not certain who they were. They were not wearing colours, while most of the rest of the crowd were in colours, including most in the hospitality area and some of the media. I have two guesses – one that they were mainly foreigners who found out about the game late and got tickets through contacts from the hotels, or that they were stragglers left over from the Amateur Cup final held as a curtain warmer, (my train times did not allow me to double up). There were quite a few leaving the ground after this as I arrived.

On the field, it was a very open game, Ujpest took an early lead and never stopped trying for a second. Diosgyori often looked the better side but did not seem to have the routes through the defence, meaning Ujpest had more chances. Most teams would have tried to shut up shop, play out the last few minutes, and the Ujpest bench appeared to be in that mood, waiting to make an injury time subsitution as the board went up for three minutes injury time. Diosgyori found the gap at this moment, and Basca levelled the scores from close range

Diosgyori had Tamas Kadar sent off six minutes into extra time, and the game died down a little, going to the almost inevitable penalty shootout. Diosgyori missed two, none were saved, Ujpest won the cup 4-3 on penalties

From the moment I had arrived at the station, it was clear that there was a major security operation on, with massed police at the station, and plenty of police moving around the area. There were blockades quite a distance from the stadium in all directions. Everyone heading to the stadium had their ticket checked, supposedly against ID, but as I entered through the press zones, I never found out for certain. My name, date and place of birth were printed on the ticket, and one had to carry ID card or passport. The question then remains, are flares, smoke bombs and crackers permitted or are the searches just not that thorough? During the game, we had plenty of competitive singing from both ends of the stadium. It appeared that despite the greater distance, Diosgyiori had slightly more and noisier fans than the local Ujpest team, but Ujpest made up for this with more flares and fireworks. There were a couple of moments though when a level of peace was restored. During the second half, I noticed that identical banners, exhorting all Hungarians to get to Bucharest for the European qualifier in October was displayed at both ends, while on the 30 minute mark the fans gave each other space to mention their pet hates (naturally also hated by the other team). Ujpest chanted about their hate of Ferencvaros, while Diosgyori’s complaint was against the Hungarian FA, and in particular the president thereof. It appears these two parties are held jointly responsible for the current situation where every top division match is considered a major security concern.

From Budapest, I took the quick route to Malmo, on board a rather packed out Wizzair A320. Wizzair are the airline that pulls out all the stops to make Ryanair look good, the flight was packed out and at Budapest, you are made to queue in a room that is nothing more than a large warehouse. Still, it meant I could have breakfast in Budapest and an early afternoon coffee in Malmo.

Marching band. Malmo style

It was a strange afternoon, the police were around in force, but acting much quieter than their counterparts in Budapest. One was not certain if they believed there was a risk of trouble or not. It is of course a very pleasant city in good weather, and coffee is one thing that is not particularly higher priced than in England.

As one walks south from the centre, you can easily pass all three of the Malmo stadiums, all of which have been used by Malmo FF at some time in their history. First up is Malmo Idrottslats, which now has an artificial pitch and is used by Sweden’s leading ladies team, (now called FC Rosengard). The pitch was in use for training and the gates were open, so I asked permission and took a couple of photos.

You then cross a park, keeping the lake on your left to take the best route, before arriving at the main complex

The old stadium, which you pass in order to reach the new one was also in use (for Athletics training). I believe Malmo IF, a lower division team currently play there while Malmo FF did until the new stadium was built. When I asked at the gates, I was directed down to the track

As with most new built stadiums, the New Stadium, Malmo has fine viewing lines. It has been built square to the pitch, with very little space between the pitch and the stands in order to give a much better atmosphere then the Malmo Stadium next door. For most of the circumference it has two uniform tiers. The exception is the north (or city) end, given over to home support. This single tier is deeper than those on the other sides, and above it is a sheer face in which the glass windows of offices or sponsors lounges overlook the pitch. Above the scoreboard there is a small balcony providing a great viewing position. As well as this balcony being a standing area, the large area below is also terrace, capable of holding 6000 standing spectators for a game like this, but then being converted to 3000 seats for European or International games. In the front of the area is a raised platform where one supporter stands, back to the game to orchestrate the chants from behind. They may as well convert the away supporters section to standing as well, as practically no one was sitting there. AIK seemed to have bought more banners and flags than the home team, and almost the full front row wore near identical shirts. The font few rows were left empty, with banners in front of the support and their own conductor (with megaphone) on the otherwise empty seats. There is no doubt that the supporters were very aware of goings on, on the pitch (unlike some German games I have been to recently, where I thought the crowd was almost blind to the game. When AIK got a free kick or corner, the chant at the home end would break off as the fans whistled their displeasure.

A lot of the displays at the ground hark back to the fact the club has won 20 Swedish titles, the most of any club. One corner has the word ROY, a picture of the current England manager looking somewhat younger than he does today and the five years (1985-1989) that marked his management of the club. In five years of Hodgson, Malmo won five Swedish titles. He also won two for Halmstads. Only one other England manager has first won the Swedish title, and Sven only did it once.

Malmo had the better of the early exchanges coming close twice in the first five minutes. In the 17th minute, Robin Quaison of AIK went down in the penalty area and got a booking for his dive. They actually showed the whole move again as a replay on the screen, bring forth laughter and derision from the home support, seeing clearly that had made the correct decision. With both sides playing a 442 the game was quite open, but Malmo’s left flank was clearly the most creative area of the game, from where Forsberg hit a shot against the post in the 27th minute. It looked as if it would go scoreless to the break, but the Malmo defence took their eye off the ball, it was knocked forward to Eero Markkanen to score for AIK. The second goal also went the way of AIK, this time scored by Quaison, who must have been as surprised as anyone when his shot went through Olsen’s grasping hands, while the keeper is sure to be blamed, the defenders will also have to question the space given to the scorer.

Five minutes later, Malmo pulled a goal back in rather strange circumstances. There was an incident near the benches and two AIK players as well as the one just substituted stopped to argue with the home bench, but the referee had not stopped play, and the ball was moved forward for Molins to score. The referee was clearly bemused by the situation, and the linesman and fourth official, both on the side seemed none the wiser. In the end, the sanctions were yellow cards for Goitom (AIK, who had just been substituted) and Jansson (Malmo, a sub who never came on). It is quite unusual to get your yellow card five minutes after leaving the pitch! There was also a marked contrast against other games in that the lighting of flares immediately after the goal brought whistles of protest from some fans, two Malmo players went to their fans to tell them to stop, and the game did not restart until the flares were out. With no security presence at the home end of the pitch, I doubt if any other action occurred, even though the culprits must have been videoed.

Meanwhile pulling one back meant that each home attack was greeted with a wave of expectation, followed by a groan as the players managed to mess it up. With 15 minutes to play, Mallmo tookthe adventurous decision to take off a full back for an attacking player. Then Molins was bought down, just inside th box by Orofi. Molins himself took the penalty and placed it at perfect saveable height, for the grateful Carlgren to push away. There were more complaints from the home fans when AIK’s Lorentzson was slow to leave the pitch injured, and did not get a booking, but the referee added no less than six minutes on. In the fourth of these minutes, Forsberg, who had been the player most responsible in the second half for not getting his shots and crosses delivered had a cross blocked for a corner, then took the corner which was only half cleared. Cibicki picked up the ball with his back to goal, took a couple of paces away from the goal and then shot the equaliser on the turn. Malmo were already two points ahead of second placed Elfsborg before the game started, but face their strongest rivals on Sunday in the last game before the world cup break.

After the game, I again kept the lake to my left, admiring the late evening colours, and the fountain which was lit up, I made my way to the local brew house, where I decided I was sampling at least something of what was on offer despite the charge of £6 for a half litre. That is six times the cost of some drinks I had taken in Poland, Slovakia and the Czech Republic. It was good beer though and I had a chat with another of the clientele, a AIK supporter down for the day who was not certain whether to celebrate his club getting a good away draw to the league leaders of mourn the points lost from 2-0 up. He did know that either way, beer was the answer. He asked me (in perfect English, of course) if I was a groundhopper, he tried to charge his phone from my charger (which is not very good), and he bought me a beer.

Spending slightly longer than I should, in the pub, a further combination of factors meant I missed the first choice train out. Not a major loss, but it meant spending 90 minutes waiting for a connection at 4 in the morning, when the original choice was to travel for two extra hours (going to Aarhus and back) to use up the time. The factors were enjoying the pub, a slight delay on a connecting train from the local station to Malmo central and the actions of one of AIK’s less helpful supporters, who had stuck a club sticker on the left luggage locker controls. If you put a sticker on a touch screen panel it just does not work (do not try this at home), and by the time I had removed the sticker and recovered my bag, I was left waiting for the next train.

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